The House helps of Kenyan Football

This week I received news that a relative of mine needs a house help like yesterday. I visited with them a few weeks ago and they had a mboch- as we like to call them, so what went wrong? Apparently, the moment she paid her July salary, she packed up her clothes, woke up very early and went through her chores but stopped at making tea. She left the tea on the fire and vanished.

 This week I received news that a relative of mine needs a house help like yesterday. I visited with them a few weeks ago and they had a mboch- as we like to call them, so what went wrong? Apparently, the moment she paid her July salary, she packed up her clothes, woke up very early and went through her chores but stopped at making tea. She left the tea on the fire and vanished.

That story left me thinking about what happened during the one month transfer window in KPL, and its aftermath. Rama Salim refused to sign a safety net contract with Gor Mahia before leaving for trials in South Africa. He did not impress at Bloemfontein Celtics and moved to Amazulu for another trial. I am yet to hear how he faired.

Back home, Timothy Wanyonyi refused to extend his contract at Gor Mahia and moved to arch rivals AFC Leopards. He was given a cheque which bounced, leaving the lad exasperated. He terminated his contract at Leopards and opted to stay out in the cold till next season.

Looking at the two sagas above, is it right to conclude that our players play their game on house help rules. Like the domestic worker, they join clubs without reading their contracts well. Like the domestic workers, it hits them when they fall sick and the boss asks them to go home and seek treatment then come back when they feel better.

The cracker is, like good house helps, they are lured with the promise of a better pay by a neighbour to her boss. This could be five hundred shillings more than what she currently earns. On arriving at her new work station, it hits her that the living standard of the new boss is relatively lower, which translates to few unwritten perks and more work. She soon begs her former boss to take her back.

You have heard of KPL players leaving for trials without the knowledge of their clubs only for their clubs to refuse to release them. It happened to Peter Opiyo when he landed a club in Oman and Leopards could not release him in the middle of the season. Dan Sserunkuma also had a similar controversy around his previous trials stint in Albania.

It is time players sought the help of professionals before signing on the dotted line. Clubs should also desist from hiring players the way we send word of mouth around to friends and relatives to get us house helps who we employ on verbal agreements. The details of the contract change with time and when the transfer window comes, a club drops up to ten players from the squad.

The fact that a club signed a player means he was worth playing in the club. If he does not meet the cut, then the problem could as well be the club and not only the player’s. To this end, the player must be compensated fully before the contract is terminated.

In honour of our domestic workers, may we start treating these important people with decorum and dignity. This should extend to our players as well, they must learn to negotiate or seek the help of professionals to assist them. We can only grow our football at the rate which we are growing our players. It will come with a higher financial cost, but we cannot have our cake and eat it at the same time.

To the players; Martin Luther King Jr. said that someone cannot ride your back unless it is bent. 

@stuttistician FB Page: Stuttistics Blog: www.stuttistics.com

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